• me, me, me

  • the pauper & the princess

    Steven McIntire Allen

    b 22 August 1963 Rangoon, Burma

    下鴨神社 Kyoto, Japan

    04 April 2008

    7/5/3

    spouse

    Kanako Allen née Yoshida

    b Nakazoshi, Japan

    Daikanyama, Japan

    15 November 2015

    Yoda’s my right hand woman

    daughter

    Skye 満華 Intireina Allen

    b 12 August 2008 Saikudani, Japan

    Izu, Japan

    22 August 2016

  • senior portrait

    mother

    Marcia Allen née McIntire

    b 1930 Honolulu, America

    author

    Rochester, America

    1948

    monks, school children & Brad

    father

    Bradley Moore Allen

    b 01 May 1928 Kalamazoo, America

    pastor

    Maymyo, Burma

    c 1965

    Japanese

    2nd & last?

    maternal grandmother

    Kimi

    domestic

    1937 Kakala Drive

    Honolulu, America

    1930

    1st McIntire not born in York, Maine since 1635

    maternal grandfather

    Sidney Chester McIntire

    b 10 October 1871 Medford, America

    attorney

    1937 Kakala Drive

    Honolulu, America

    1930

    all in the family

    paternal grandmother top left

    Ethel May Allen née Dennis

    b 12 May 1898 Sarnia, Canada

    homemaker

    418 Stuart Avenue

    Kalamazoo, America

    25 December 1960

    the real Job

    paternal grandfather

    Harold Brainerd Allen

    b 27 September 1896 Detroit, America

    Secretary, Board of Directors, Upjohn Pharmaceutical

    Kalamazoo College yearbook

    Kalamazoo, America

    1918

  • I was born at Seventh Day Adventist Hospital in Rangoon. I was probably the only Caucasian in the maternity ward, and for years I did not realise I was Caucasian. As an adult, in part because I discovered I was not identifying as Caucasian, I began to not identify as male, heterosexual, American, etc. Not that I'm not those things, but I often find those mindsets counterproductive.

     

    Just before I was conceived in Rangoon the government changed hands. When I was three, and my family had spent five years in Rangoon, we were scheduled to return to America, but the church asked my father to stay in Rangoon. The Burmese government had instructed all non-Asian missionaries to leave, so we left.

     

    I was raised in Rochester, New York. I say raised, because growing up is something I try to do every day. Language and teaching are brainwashing. Learning is something we do for ourselves.

     

    Summers I taught water skiing at a camp in Maine. After college I bought an old motorcycle and drove west to work at Alta, Utah for a season. I then worked in the Bay area, studied Swedish while working in a factory in rural Sweden, and worked as a ski guide in Austria. Next I was a migrant labourer in Spain, a water skiing instructor on an idyllic island in Greece, and a motorcycle courier in London. Also in England, I taught slalom water skiing with the world's #2. I sailed a 1920s Grand Banks schooner around the Caribbean, and then, like my mother's father, became an attorney.

     

    I began studying Japanese just before law school. During law school I lived in Ishinomaki on the JET Programme. I studied a semester of law school in Japanese and English in Tokyo, and interned at a think tank in Tokyo. My Japanese name, Masahisa Minamoto, appears on my Japan driver's license. My Japanese is a bit too natural, and may cause discomfort.

     

    I practiced in New York City until a Japanese game software company brought me to Los Angeles. Japan’s largest law firm moved me to Tokyo. After four years in Tokyo an international transactions boutique moved me to Osaka. In 2017 I was deported for whistleblowing.

     

    Besides gender, racial and orientation bias, I try to overcome what I’ve labeled temporalism. Oftentimes we look back at our societies and project our inadequacies onto our ancestors. Whether with women’s or racial emancipation, we tell ourselves we’ve progressed. The truth is we’re not that different.

     

    One thing Japan taught me is, more than our best imaginings or worst nightmares, we are products of our environment. I don’t wish to judge. Perhaps that’s one reason I chafe when I’m judged. If I snark when I feel micromanaged, please accept this apology.

     

    Also, I try to speak English, not American, but even when I’m trying to speak American I’m pompous. Sometimes my brain computer interface (BCI) makes me laugh.

     

    After 20 years in Asia, visiting 48 states, working in six, and working in 10 nations, I live in Denver, Colorado. Like most, I took the spirituality of my birthplace, Buddhism. I meditate several times a day. May you be happy and well.